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is something like this. >> stuff that's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. >> okay. is that a fair comparison? we're going to report and you're going to decide. how does the "duck dynasty" family celebrate christmas? the ladies, miss kay, cory, missy and jessica join us live next from west monroe, louisiana. ♪ ♪ before using her new bank of america credit card, which rewards her for responsibly managing her card balance. before receiving $25 toward her balance each quarter for making more than ht on time each month. tracey got the bankamericard better balance rewards credit card, which fits nicely with everything else in life she has to balance. that's the benefit of responsibility. apply online or visit a bank of america near you. at any minute... ...you could be a victim of fraud. most people don't even know it. fraud could mean lower credit scores, higher loan rates... ...and maybe not getting the car you want. it's a problem waiting to hapn. check your credit score, check your credit repo, at experian.com america's numb one provider of online credit rorts an
about him and prayed for him all the years in prison. while the american civil rights movement was going on here in this country and here in los angeles. he came to visit the first ame churn only a few months after he was released from prison in south africa. they have pictures of him on the walls inside. it was a big moment for them here. we did get a chance earlier today to speak to one of the parishioners about meeting nelson mandela. >> i'll always remember that. what a blessing to meet this gentle man. more than anything in life, the one that taught us to forgive. the hardest thing to do in life is to forgive, but he told us to forgive. it's the most important asset of our life, to forgive and move on, yes. he is my hero. he is my papa. >> reporter: as you can tell, she, too, was born in aftrica bt been here for 27 years. they're remembering nelson mandela here today but remember him at the first ame church virtually forever. richelle. >> can you talk more about the special connection this church teams to nelson mandela? >> reporter: it's because he came here. his grandsons came her
. >> nelson mandela's life work extended behind the native south africa. we sat with civil rights leader the reverend jessie jackson, and he drew parallels with his movement and the struggle in the u.s. >> there was a sameness about the struggle there and here. both faced persecution in 1953. king was gaoled and bricked and stabbed at 39. nelson mandela was gaoled and put on the terrorist list by the u.s. government and emerged as a moral authority, both have that moral character. barack obama on the other hand - he was the ben factor of the struggles. he's a generation behind. >> nelson mandela and the king were transformative figures. >> we saw a picture of you and nelson mandela with one of my colleagues, morgan radford, who got the chance to meet nelson mandela for the first time. tell me about the man you knew. >> i must say when i was in cape down south africa, he was released. immediately he recognised me and called my name. i was overwhelmed. he knew it was going on. he was current, alive and alert. he didn't just read the speech that day, he wrote it. he also was a great debater
of his skin was the main driver for nelson mandela as it was for civil rights leader here in the united states. there is a join and conjunction there. i think people in this country as dr. hill points out, had a special afint afinty for nelson mandela. >> you saw that, dr. hill, first hand. your organization transafrica played a pivotal role in the anti-apartheid movement. was mande mandela here in greatt to say "thank you" to the united states? >> yes he was here to say, "thank you" he had a very important agenda to present himself and the african national congress as kind of a political configuration that could assume state power and lead the nation through the non-apartheid era. that was a very important aspect to his visit. equally as important, however, was to have the kind of public support for mr. mandela and the organization and the public content and to have that public support that would out weigh the notion that they were. >> he himself said he didn't want to be known as a saint sai. if we go too far in bea beatifyg him that the message will be lost. we always have to be conc
luther king jr. and the country's civil rights and you were on south africa on the day mandela walked out of prison. tell us about that moment. >> you know, it was a moment difficult to describe. he took us on unbelievable heights of joy that day. and the depths of pain. a huge larger than life figure. i've gotten into south africa quite by chance in 1979 and connected with his family and we instructed in the 1990. and we had the feeling he would be released this weekend so my son and i met him there. what surprised me was he recognized me and call my name. he had seen the convention speech from the democratic convention. he came out and stopped. i'm sure the governor will say that he was unbelievably slumped. he came out not just reading speeches but up for debate. >> what do you think his enduring legacy will be around the world? is it the concept that i've heard you speak? the concept of forgiveness and reconciliation? >> i think it is the thing everybody says. that he was the true towering moral figure of our time. why do people say that he is the leader that they most respect? everyb
. this is a major civil rights case and nationally known after hurricane katrina. they thought they had closure. now they know that they don't. >> that has to be true of the glover team. we've just seen those pictures. bell he continue to see that. thank you. >> the obama administration said it has met it's deadline to fix the healthcare.gov website. the administration promised all would be well in november. we will gather to the white house with more details, mike, this was a big deadline for the administration. are all the problems with the website solved? >> reporter: they aren't all solved but they say its like night and day after that disastrous launch of octobe october 1st. they cite certain benchmarks, certain metrics, error rates down to 1%. they were 6% at the outset of this debacle in the estimation of administration officials. as many as 800,000 a day and they achieved 90% functionality. you recall that by the end of last month, november 31st they had promised an 80% functionality. by their own estimation they have exceeded that. but that's by their own estimation. for the time being we'
of the apartheid foe and civil rights icon, nelson mandela. we continue that, just ahead. ♪ we know we're not the center of your life, but we'll do our best to help you connect to what is. ♪ [ male announcer ] laura's heart attack didn't come with a warning. today her doctor has her on a bayer aspirin regimen to help reduce the risk of another one. if you've had a heart attack, be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. you know that, right? uh-huh. i know this hasn't always been easy for you. and i'm really happy that you're in my life too. ♪ it's just like yours, mom! [ jane ] behind every open heart is a story. tell yours with my open hearts collection at kay jewelers, the number one jewelry store in america. there are millions of reasons to give one, but the message is always the same. keep your heart open... and love will always find its way in. thank you. thank you. ♪ every kiss begins with kay thank you. ♪ feed them natural and healthy blue™ buffalo, like family, featuring lifesource® bits that are now enhanced with our super 7 package of natu
in america, so much of the american civil rights movement was reminding african-americans and still is, reminding young children of color, you are equal, you do deserve the exact same things. i think that made a huge difference. >> i think part of that was if you understand he was born in royalty. he was born to a certain manner. his self-concept, he that naturally and he never lost it. because he didn't have that insecurity, he didn't need all that to become a leader. his vanity never outran his sanity. >> talking about the legacy of nelson mandela, we're talking about how those qualities of grace, dignity, humility have been inherited or visited on later generations. i want to play an excerpt from your interview with the president last night where he himself takes a remarkably humble posture as far as being commander in chief, president of the united states. lets take a listen to that. >> the interesting thing about now having been president for five years. it makes you humbler as opposed to cockier as to what you as an individual can do. you recognize you're just part of the sweep o
mandela. how the son of another civil rights icon is help remembering a man who helped end apartheid. 'y and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. [ mthat if you wear a partial,w you're almost twice as likely to lose your supporting teeth? try poligrip for partials. poligrip helps minimize stress which may damage supporting teeth by stabilizing your partial. care for your partial. help protect your natural teeth. >>> former presidents george w. bush and bill clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president's death. crowds outside his johannesburg home are singing their tributes. ♪ hundreds of people of all ages and co
, the '60s is a movement, the years of civil rights movement, the '80s, south africa, anti-apartheid activism, i think there was both but it was so riveting and real. even back to sharkville and the killing of 69 people, the kids in '76 in soweto. high school and elementary school children who are gunned down. it's tallas power of the images. you talked about nelson mandela. we did not see him for decades because they forbid his pic churs or voice from being heard. now we have the pictures from south africa. when you have children being gunned down, that is very hard to talk about. >> when we come back, what happened when ted cruz try day friday -- tried to remember nelson mandela this week. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our com
for a real ak-47. the lopez family since filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the deputy and the department claiming that shooting was unjustified. the santa rosa police department in the meantime is still investigating. the county board of supervisors meeting starts at 8:30 this morning, along with appointing members to this community and law enforcement task force, supervisors also are expected to decide whether to explore the creation of a memorial park at the site where andy lopez was killed. the field where he was shot back in october. that meeting, again, starts at 8:30 this morning. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >>> time now 5:06. 9-1-1 calls made during the sandy hook elementary school shooting rampage will be released tomorrow. connecticut state attorney had been fighting against releasing those recordings saying the recordings of seven calls made from inside the school would be painful for the victims' families. now he says he won't challenge a judge's decision to make the calls public. last december a gunman shot and killed
's airsoft bb gun for a real ak-47. lopez's family has filed a civil rights lawsuit against the deputy and the department claiming that shooting was unjustified. the santa rosa police department in the meantime is still investigating, and this county board of supervisors meeting will begin later on this morning at 8:30, and that's when they will take up this issue over the task force. it's a community and law enforcement task force that again will be appointed later on today here in santa rosa. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge ktvu channel 2 news. >>> thank you. new this morning, police have tracked down a teenage boy who escaped from san fransisco's juvenile detention center. officers took the 17-year-old boy into custody on treasure island late last night. several hours after his escape. there's no word on why the boy was in juvenile hall or exactly how officers found him. >>> this morning emergency crews in idaho hope to resume the search for a san jose pilot and his four passengers. air traffic controllers lost contact with their plane sunday as the pilot was attemptin
and excessive force, which are federal civil rights violations. concord city attorney mark coon told me he doesn't comment on pending litigation but the city will defend a lawsuit. joe vasquez kpix 5. >>> a popular cable tv host bill was killed in a motorcycle crash in san francisco. he cohosted the show curb appeal on hdtv. a car struck and killed him last night as he rhode through the lower. you can still see evidence from the crash near oak and stiener. it's not clear who was at fault. police say the driver of the car is cooperating. beckwith was 38 years old. >>> new clue tonight in the search for that missing san jose pilot and his family. betty yu says the crews have a much better idea of where that plane went down. >> the smiths are a tight-knit mormon family. after spending thanksgiving weekend in oregon, silicon valley xhektive dale smith left for montana. his son daniel and his son's wife, his daughter amber and her fiance were in his beach bonanza similar to the one pictured here. it ran into engine trouble over central idaho sunday. smith intend today land at the remote johnson creek
's worth it is always hard. civil rights movement was hard. giving women the right to vote, that was hard. workers have the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been easy. for us to change how we do business in this country. >> reporter: so the president back on offense trying to put the last two months behind him and resell the affordable care act as the deadline of decembe december 23rd approach as soon as a winter storm is start to go make its way through the upper midwest after dumping snow in the west. let's take a look at these picture of a tractor trailer accident. the wow, the state highway parole said 300 car accidents across the wasatch front, a dozens of accidents were reported elsewhere in the state. let's go to dave warren. >> meteorologist: this is a wig storm and it will work its way across the mountains and bring cold air in and warm air from the south. that's the problem. the heavy snow dumped a lot of snow and caused a lot of problems on the roadway, and the cold air continues to move south. fast forward to now and tomorrow, here's the problem now we're getting w
hard. the civil rights movement was hard. giving me women the right to vo, that was hard. making sure we had the right to organize, that was hard. it's never been busy how we do business in this country. >> tony, the president has a wig problem. even with young people with startling statistics out of harvard, they came out with numbers. 39% of so-called millennials, 18 to 29-year-olds, only 39% approve of the affordable care act. 20%, just 20% of those polled intend to enroll. almost half do not intend to enroll. that could be bad news. >> mike, thank you ♪ >> mark morgan is here with the headlines in sports and big news for major college football. >> reporter: the prosecutor looking into sexual assault allegations against florida state quarterback jameis winston said that his investigation is complete, and he will announce his findings tomorrow afternoon. now william meggs said its up to prosecutors if there is enough evidence to charge winston and prosecutors have to decide if they charge is there a reasonable chance of conviction. that announcement is expected tomorrow. meanwhile
that there is true freedom in forgiveness. >>> joining me now, civil rights leader and president of the rainbow push coalition, reverend jesse jackson. awfully glad to speak with you. you listened to president clinton. do you agree he belongs in the statues of history with gandhi, martin luther king jr. if not maybe at the top of the list? >> external persecution and the wil will, dignity. they were driven by their suffering. you define them by what they did with the pain. that is to say when mr. mandela chose to use his pain for transformation. to use his pain for reconciliation, revenge or retaliation it took him to different level. >> what was it like to be in the same room as he was. oftentimes there are leaders -- and i will say this is applied to you as well. there are some people you think they take up all the energy because there's something about them. he must have had that as well. >> well, he did have a personal magnetism. i remember the first sunday he came out of jail in cape town at south africa at city hall. he walked in the room. having been in jail for 27 years, so aware and so aler
. stateside, a yuounger generatio of american civil rights leaders is reflecting on the legacy of the man and how he inspired them. one of them downing me now from washington, d.c. former president and ceo of the naacp, ben jellis. i'd like to know when nelson mandela first got on your radar. what was the first context in which you learned about him and when you first saw him in person. >> you know, the first conversation was with my mom explaining to me why we couldn't drink coke and we couldn't get gas from the shell station and really talking about how similar the struggle that was happening then in south africa was to what she had gone through as a young person in this country. the first time i saw him was he was doing a tour when he got out of prison. it was 1989. he came to the coliseum in the east bay. i and tens of thousands of people were all gathered there. i recall pushing my way up to the front. you know, for us, we were used to having black leaders assassinated in their prime and spending the rest of our lives wondering what could have been, what would have been. and with him
in the civil rights struggle against apartheid i think makes it very meaningful. his presence will be significant. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage, we know he's talking about this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. he said it's 50/50 or, frankly, it could be worse. his approval numbers very low here. when it comes to the international stage, how is his capital right now? >> i don't think it's exceedingly high. i think a lot of america's allies, particularly in the middle east from israel to some of the gulf countries think america has lost its nerve in some regard, particularly when it comes to confronting iran. so i think there is some difficulty with ourbili because our economic standing has some impact as well. it doesn't diminish america's overall power in the world and america's real influence in the world. that is still very, very strong, even if some people have doubts about president obama. >> how much of a focus is there for president obama in terms of international, seg tear hagel making his way to afg
a federal civil rights lawsuit against boat the deputy and the department. the santa rosa police department is investigating that shooting. this county board of supervisors meeting will begin an hour from now. along with appointing members to the community and law enforcement task force. supervisors here later on today are also expected to make a decision on whether to move forward to the creation of a memorial park that is planned or could be planned for the site, the field where andy lopez was shot and killed in october. live this morning in santa rosa, alex savidge, ktvu channel 2 news. >> congress is moving to move a ban on guns that could evade metal detectors. it's due to expire next monday. mandemocrats wanted permanent metal components that would make plastic guns more detectable. the republican--led house is expected to have this changed. >>> the search continues for a missing couple that disappeared during a thanksgiving fishing trip. 64-year-old van chanpenxi and his wife, chantra. went wishing on the delta last thursday. their boat was found still running near the rio vista brid
with luis. she also became very interested in civil rights. we have a problem at that time was a white supremacist group in town, and she held a group of people lobby to get a unanimous vote in the legislature for a law allowing civil damages for civil harassment. that brought an end to that white supremacist compound that gave coeur d'alene a pretty bad name sometimes. she didn't want anyone to be known for that. at one point people and urged her to for governor, and share the name recognition. she had the people behind or. she had a lot of the things that any of the politicians would want, and she knew it. but she didn't. she chose not to. for several reasons, and i talk about them in the book but i think the biggest, she was not one to say her own name over and over. she preferred to work behind the scenes. and became one of those people that worked in the senator's office, and the congressman's office, the governor's office, to get things done outside the political fight. i came here 20 years ago to be the pastor of her church. i count in the book some interesting little stories. o
of so much history, working with civil rights leaders like reverend jesse jackson, corretja scott king and eleanor holmes norton. mary frann sis berry, the former commissioner of the civil rights commission, eeoc and robinson would transafrica. i was a kid during those days. they were organizing protests outside the south african embassy. my job was to help find and identify people who would get arrested, to keep the movement alive. it was a very tremendous moment and opportunity, but later i had an opportunity, working on a clinton/gore campaign and nelson mandela after visiting harlem in the 1990s, wanted to come to the inaugural of bill clinton. he had great affection and respect and admiration for bill and hillary clinton. i was an advanced person back during those days. i helped to escort him around. my good friend, yolanda, who was in that picture, it was a great moment. later i had an opportunity to go to south africa and other places to help train workers and volunteers who would conduct the first multiracial elections in south africa. he was authentic. he was a giant. you know
was really sad. >> miami gardens police chief won't say much about sampson's case, due to the pending civil rights lawsuit filed against his department. the department has conducted it's own investigation since last year. the chief says the department uses data, not profiling, to fight crime. >> you got a black chief, african-american chief, african-american mayor, african-american city manager. that does not make sense. a predominantly trick american city, i know the department didn't do anything wrong. >> it's an aggressive policing approach, focusing on small crime like trespassing to prevent bigger ones. the department's zero tolerance policing program is effective. miami gardens was the 15t 15th most violent city of its size, last year dropped to the 40th. >> police must take con terrence about racial profiling seriously or lose local trust i don't by abusing the rights of so many people systematically, you alienate communities and this is a breeding ground for crime. >> dis enchanted, sampson now looks at the police as a potential jailer, not a protector. >> they have spent about $20,
as lawyer, i've had to persuade civil rights groups to take particular positions when, for example, in new york city once an organization wanted to stop george lincoln rockwell, a terrible racist, from speaking in a park there, and i had a very difficult time persuading them that that's probably the -- trying to keep him from being licensed to speak is probably the best way to give him a big audience. why not just ignore him? and the same thing with books. you know, sometimes i know authors can't get any better advertisement than somebody trying to keep their books off the shelves. but when it does happen -- and it does happen frequently -- we're really talking about one of the most dangerous robs in our culture -- problems in our culture, and it is the stifling of ideas and taken to the extreme in nazi germany when they burn books, we see where that goes. so my excerpt isn't as delightful as the last one. it concerns the problems of war, and it comes from a book almost 100 years old about war, "all quiet on the western front." before going over to see -- [inaudible] we pack up his things.
. >> reporter: i want to get your thoughts as someone who has walked among civil rights giants and nelson mandela, and martin luther king. how aware were the two of them aware to their roles in the struggles? >> dr. king went to jail in '63 and so did nelson mandela. dr. king in his address referenced the struggle in south africa. the kinship from the american corporations and south africa and our government that was a part of it. also the things that we did here enabled mandela's freedom. for example, the '65 riots act that changed the course in this country. blacks could vote for the first time in the south and women could vote and you could vote on campuses and bilanguagebilangua. it clouded the sanctions on south africa led by congressman randell o. it seems to me our struggle and their struggle coincided very well. >> reporter: we appreciate your thoughts on this day, remembering nelson mandela. thank you. >> i'll see you before the week is over. >> reporter: all right. look forward to it. let's head back to new york now and erica. >> lester, thanks. >>> we want to turn to encour e
people wanted justice, and especially coming out at the end of the civil rights movement, a lot of people in the united states were thinking where do i put my energy now. the idea and the images that were coming out of south africa with rewards to the apartheid movement really ignited their imagination and the passion for justice. >> can't wait to see the film. >> thank you. >> thank you for being with us. the film is the 12 disciples of nelson mandela. it is about the people who were behind the scenes of the movement. here's what we can expect next in south africa. nelson mandela will be laid to rest during the official state funeral taking place in a 10 day period. tomorrow begins the memorial service, open to the public. the government are he can specking 80,000 people to be in attendance there. from wednesday to friday, international visitors will view mandelle la's remains. his body will be taken to the eastern cape where the ruling party will then pay their final respects. sunday, december 15 will bring the 10 day funeral to an end. dignitaries scheduled to attend, 71 expected to be
the modern mother of the civil rights movement, rosa parks. this past sunday, we celebrated the 58th anniversary of rosa parks refusing to give up her seat on that bus in montgomery, alabama. i am so proud to stand here from the great state of ohio because it was the great state of ohio that was the first state in this nation to name december 1 rosa parks day. on thursday and friday of this week in our district, we will bring people from all over the state to pay tribute to her. and we will bring in more than 600 little children who will learn about civil rights and understand the value of working together. the last day, 1955, she started something larger than herself. she stood -- she sat down so we could stand up. mr. speaker, it is my honor to be a part of the legislation that created december 1 in ohio as rosa parks day. thank you and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? >> i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend my remarks. the speake
. is he forced to make this apology by the north koreans? >>> plus, cnn on the front lines right now in syria's civil war. our own cnn crew gets rare access to one of the most brutal conflicts on the planet right now. there are seniors who have left hundreds of dollars of savings on the table by not choosing the right medicare d plan. no one could have left this much money here. whoo-hoo-hoo! yet many seniors who compare medicare d plans realize they can save hundreds of dollars. cvs/pharmacy wants to help you save on medicare expenses. talk to your cvs pharmacist, call, or go to cvs.com/compare to get your free, personalized plan comparison today. call, go online, or visit your local store today. millions have raised their hand for the proven relief of the purple pill. and that relief could be in your hand. for many, nexium helps relieve heartburn symptoms from acid reflux disease. find out how you can save at purplepill.com. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, cont
of guerrilla leaders in civil wars anywhere who just hate the opposition, right? you see that in syria today but he managed not to let that pull him down but to just focus on changing the system and not hating the people. jon: tom carver covered the end of apartheid in south africa for the bcc. he talked to nelson mandela a couple of types. tom, thank you for sharing those thoughts. >> you're welcome. >> some new details emerging from the investigation into the tragic death of paul walker. police now making an arrest in what they say that these two men stole from the scene of the crash and how they found out about it. we'll get you up-to-date on that. >>> also the white house says the obamacare website now works for most americans. why problems with the site can lead to a nasty surprise for some people who think they signed up for insurance. every day we're working to be an even better company - and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. througall of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in t
people who make the civil war chest set or whatever. right? it's like a lead list. >> it's for your own good. >> the "los angeles times" piece says they were shocked. they didn't even complete the application process and they were getting phone calls. take heart in peter levy. he says, i can imagine some people may be upset but i can see some people will be comforted and relieved to get help navigating the website. >> your average sleazy marketer knows he's a sleazy marketer operating over a space above a starbucks. these people are doing it because they feel they have a moral right to do it. you ought to be grateful they're giving away your information to no one you've never heard of. >> it's okay for big government to do it but not mom and pop shops who have to adhere to the do not call list. >> or the do not e-mail list or canned spam act. >> it doesn't apply to the government. >> it's all because they're trying to make their deadline. that's the arg gurmt that cover california is making, too, hey, we have these deadlines for enrollment numbers and we're behind schedule so we have to
or throat, or difficulty breathing or swallowing, stop taking cialis and get medical help right away. ask your doctor about cialis for daily use and a 30-tablet free trial. >> health care manufacturer johnson & johnson will pay to sell civil allegations. >> i expect this from you, johnson, but not you, johnson. to be honest, i have not trusted johnson & johnson since i tried to stop my child's crying with the no more tears shampoo in his eyes. did not work. >> the 113th hasn't passed the bills every congress does like a highway bill or defense bill or farm bill or a budget. what do we need a budget for? clearly not for highways, defense, or food. congress did pass a bill ensuring that people can fish near dams on the cumberland river and also passed deep cuts in food stamps if are the poor which is good solid governing because the poor don't need food stamps anymore now that they can fish near dams on the coupler withland river. >> time to talk about what we learned. we learned a lot. i learned you can catch a munch kin in your mouth if it is delivered right. >> it's not good. really bad
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)